Kayak and Fishing Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have always had flares onboard the yak but figured they would be of little use if my yak and I parted company. I have come up with this solution. However I am not sure how waterproof these hand held flares are and how this installation could affect my PFD. I can't think of any immediate probs and it is a handy spot to stash one (night time red flare). I simply made a small slit in this doulble layer of material that reaches across to the zipper.

Been paddling with it a few times and don't notice its even there!

Does anyone else have flares/an epirb attached to their person on a similar PFD?
 

Attachments

G

·
Would there be any danger of the flare going off in the event of a freak accident/bump?

If so, I would want it as far away from my face as possible?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Yeap - I have a pack on mini flares- on off shore oil rigs the safety suits have them. They are small compack and water proof. They cost around $150 for a set of 8. They only burn for 5 seconds and are designed for you to launch 2 -3 in 3 to 4 minute intervals. Fit neatly in the front pocket of my pdf. I don't know they are there most of the time.

That would be my recommendation.
regards
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
but you only need them for offshore?
or is it a good idea to get some for the rivers?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,443 Posts
I keep 3 small flares in a waterproof bag tucked into a pocket on my PFD. In addition to the flares, I keep a knife, VHF MB radio, whistle, small GPS and a couple of emergency beacons attached to my PFD. I also carry a Camelback backpack that I use as a bail-out kit. The reservoir holds a liter of water and the pockets are packed with other survival gear. The basic load-out is: 3 large flares, 2 smoke signals, signal mirror, 4 Cyalume lightsticks, 3-4 energy bars, bottle of Gatorade sports drink, sunscreen, lip balm, small first aid kit, neoprene wetsuit gloves and hood. I keep the Camelback behind my seat on most trips, but I wear it if I'm going to be more than a couple of kilometers off shore.
 
G

·
DGax65 said:
I keep 3 small flares in a waterproof bag tucked into a pocket on my PFD. In addition to the flares, I keep a knife, VHF MB radio, whistle, small GPS and a couple of emergency beacons attached to my PFD. I also carry a Camelback backpack that I use as a bail-out kit. The reservoir holds a liter of water and the pockets are packed with other survival gear. The basic load-out is: 3 large flares, 2 smoke signals, signal mirror, 4 Cyalume lightsticks, 3-4 energy bars, bottle of Gatorade sports drink, sunscreen, lip balm, small first aid kit, neoprene wetsuit gloves and hood. I keep the Camelback behind my seat on most trips, but I wear it if I'm going to be more than a couple of kilometers off shore.
Great Advice there...... 8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies,

Dallas unfortunately my face is attched to my body and the pfd attached to that.... :lol: the flare i carry has a screw top which has to be undone in order to operate it, hopefully it won't let go paddling along, but where else do you put one hey?! :shock: no digs, just can't think of another way.

Dgax you must be another navy ( squidy) boy over there. That's a lot of gear to take out each time, but suppose it comes in handy if in the poop. I really need to get a epirb that hangs off the back of the pfd and perhaps some mini flares, a camel back pasck is a great idea brutha! Should have thought of that by now.... cheers

JB, you are on a goodun, I might try to source those mini flares! Don't know where to get them here but they sound much more convienent than the big suckers!

Thanks heaps for the feed back, by the by when i go to risky places I have a small survival kit which clips on my carabiner, it holds all sorts of goodies including a spare fishing hook and line! Water is always a problem... camel back system sounds like a winner! :D Much better than drinking the juice around fish bones!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
In hindsight, i should pose the question dallas asked... IS there any chanch of these flares letting go by them selves? Has any one heard of such a mishap? Iknow guys that have had them on boats for ages, till used by date is up with no mishaps. If they do muck up I will get rid of it!!! :shock: Dunno :eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,443 Posts
Matt
How did you know I was a squid? :lol:
I do go a little overboard (pun intended) on the safety gear. Although I've been in the Navy/Navy Reserve for 17 years, I'll be the first to admit that I'm not the strongest swimmer in the world. I've had some close calls and I want to be prepared if I ever wind up in the water, separated from my yak. I frequently fish / paddle several kilometers offshore, so it makes sense for me to carry all of that gear. I generally take the same survival equipment whether I'm in the bay or off shore. I figure its just a good practice to always be prepared.
I feel confident keeping flares on my PFD. I haven't heard of any accidents, but there are some basic precautions that you can take to prevent an accidental discharge. Make sure that your flares have a safety device to prevent an accidental launch. Mine have a plastic cap that protects the firing lanyard. I perform an integrity check on the flares regularly. The flares are kept in a waterproof bag in the pocket of my PFD. This keeps them dry and reduces the chance of inadvertent removal of the safety.
I can't overstate the importance of an EPIRB if you are going to be paddling offshore. It is important to have a VHF MB radio and cell phone, but you have to understand their limitations. With a 1 meter antenna height, the radio horizon for a line of site VHF radio is only 3.6km; less with higher sea state or poor atmospherics. The 406 MHz EPIRB is visible to the satellite under most conditions. Some newer personal EPIRB have either internal GPS receivers or data ports to allow communications with a GPS unit. This allows your location to be sent along with the distress signal and identifier. For me, that is worth the $649USD.

http://www.orionsignals.com/Marine/Products/aerial/alertsignalkit.html
http://www.acrelectronics.com/aquafix/
http://www.gme.net.au/epirb/mt310.php
http://www.cospas-sarsat.org/Beacons/beaconManufactureList.htm
http://www.amsa.gov.au/Search_and_Rescue/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah nice one Aaron!!! :lol: You youngens.....

Let me know when you pick em up, i'll have squiz before spending the coin myself. Perhaps we can catch some fish. Been catching up with Duncan a bit lately, he is keen as mustard to get out at almost any opportunity.

PM either of us if you want to have a paddle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Should have said thanks to you also Douglas. Where I go offshore over here there always seems to be people around in stink boats, epirb would be a great investment but just always seems like so much coin when I reckon if I pulled a flare out off adelaide, boats and things would come from everywhere..... don't want to find out.

Perhaps I will upgrade the pfd to one with more pockets at some stage... probably get the epirb at same time so I have got somewhere to put it.

Tight Lines!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,443 Posts
Matt

Everybody develops a certain comfort level for kayaking. This comfort level is a product of your experience, skill and the equipment that you carry. I've been kayak fishing for about four years now, but before that, I never really spent much time on/in the water (time on the aircraft carrier doesn't count). For this reason my level of confidence on the water is not as high as somebody who spent his whole life surfing or kayaking. I tend to gear up to compensate for the shortfall in experience. Some (many) might think that I am going overboard with the safety gear, but it gives me the confidence to go out and enjoy myself and concentrate on fishing.
I agree that flares or radio would work well in most situations, but sometimes ocean/atmospheric conditions can make it difficult to signal other boats, even if they are relatively close. Flares might get attention at night, but they are very hard to localize. I like the idea of having my GPS coordinates being sent out with the distress beacon. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Douglas, where your personal safety is concerned there can never be too much gear/equipment. Kayak fishing is supposed to be a relaxing an enjoyable experience... so as you say being confident and comfortable are top priorities. Sorry if I sounded like I was bagging you for having too much gear. Just seemed like I really lack a lot of items re. safety!

Taken flare out of the zipper now. Don't know where to put it again besides on the yak...... Like peter said it probably would blow my head off or certainly light my smoke if it went off! :shock:

Just got some vouchers for my birthday so I will look at getting those mini flares that Aaron was looking at.

Top links there too, Douglas. 8)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,278 Posts
The safety gear I carry includes;
On PFD
* PFD
* Whistle
* Strobe (princeton tec eco-flare)
* Small waterproof torch (princeton tec Blast)
* EPIRB
* Light-sticks
* Plastic signalling Mirror
* Radio
* Knife
* Flare

On Kayak
* First Aid Kit
* Head Torch (Silva L1)
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top