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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a recipe from South America.
Onion, capsicum, garlic clove, small tomato, chilli and bunch corriander all diced. Cube two fillets into 1cm cubes or thin wafers. White fish fillets like snapper are best, fantasic with flathead, and I,ve heard it can turn rubbishy tunas into a tasy treat(although this I've havnt tried yet). The original way I was told was a generous handful of salt, but now I use a tablespoon and a bit of salt, some pepper.
Add to a bowl and cover with fresh lime or lemon juice. Place in fridge for 45 min then eat.
Over there it is a common pickme up, hangover food, general health food , fast food and fishermans food. The white juice in the bowl after eating is Tigers Milk or Tiger Juice and can be drunk straight up or with a nip of vodka or rum. You can experiment with different herbs and stuff like carrots and mangoes. Even though its raw the lime or lemon juice cooks the fish. It really does give an instant boost.
I plan to make a jar of base and take it on the kayak, catch a fish, cut it up, whack it in the jar, keep fishing, have lunch.
Hope you enjoy
 

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The recipe sounds good. The thought of filleting and skinning a fish of the size I catch (small) while on the water doesn't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
YakAtak,
I think skinning is wise as is uncooked, especially a flathead ! The flatty I have used have all been caught in the ocean and have been sensational.
Make a small test portion, remember completely cover fish with juice and heaps of salt, 45-60 min in fridge, you'll be hooked after the rush you get from this food !!!
 

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MMM Sounds great specially the bit about the Tigers milk with vodka. Might help those hangovers i seem to get a lot of. :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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It's ok, don't call 911, I lived! Quite an amazing dish that, will no doubt do it again. The fish is amazingly tasty, and I even had the juice with some absolute to wash it down, that wasnt as easy as eating the main course. I used habernero chillis, and wore my sombrero, but unfortunately didnt have any tequila which probably would have been nicer than vodka.
Cheers,
Karl.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Karl,
Hope you enjoyed it ! I used some oranges once to sweeten it up a bit, it was interesting as well. Its a good one to experiment with. Did you end up trying it with flathead ?
B
 

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Hi Breambo, Outstanding recipie mate. it is the answer to this sea kayaker prayers. Quick, easy and can be "cooked" while underway. You bloody beauty :D :D :D
 

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I expect finding a surface on the yak to skin a fillet with a knife could be difficult. So flathead would be a good choice as once you have the fillet the skin just peels off.

Rob.
 

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Depends on the set up mate. I have made a board platform that mounts on the deck in front of me, holds a rod holder, knife and a donger to one side and the other is ALL CUTTING BOARD :D :D. A small cooler is attached to the deck behind me, too easy. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have heard of Peruvian fishermen go out early catch some fresh fish, because they have no refridgeration, come to shore, make a big tub of seviche, bury it in the cool sand, go back fishing. When its lunchtime they come back and its ready.
Did I mention I have made it with bream and its also good but I find it finicky to fillet and seem to waist a lot even on big snowies. Maybe someone has some tips on this ?
B
 

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For cooking Bream in general, I never fillet. Too much waste. I always cook the Bream whole. Having said that, dont keep many Bream, maybe 3 or 4 in a year.
 

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Cilantro and coriander are the same plant, but in the US we use the term cilantro when referring to the fresh leaves, and coriander usually refers to the dried seeds of the plant.



How did the ceviche come out? :D
 
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