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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This post was first supplied from Mark Sunderland, an experienced sea kayaker. It is reproduced here, courtesy of Ian McDade from SE Qld Sea Kayak Club (SEQSKC).

It shows that when things get rough, everything is more difficult if someone goes over and cannot self rescue. Please, do not discount this by saying, "I would never go out in those conditions." That may be true, but even BOM gets it very wrong occasionally (witness the 1998 Sydney to Hobart). If we go on the water, something similar could happen to any of us, even on a lake or dam (say in a thunderstorm). When you are off your yak, is when the importance of prior practice and skills is paramount.

It has happened to me a few times, and the speed the seas build has to be seen to be believed. As are the things that don't go to plan.

Ian McDade: "I saw these video links on the Sea Kayak Forum regarding rough water rescues.( if you have not already seen it) . Thanks to Mark Sunderland who posted it.


Maybe of interest given the conditions we have been experiencing lately. A few things come to mind after viewing this.

1. The need to have a plan/strategy in place that your paddling buddies are aware of. i.e who/what is going to be rescued... the boat or paddler.

2. Practice skills in rough conditions, not just in benign conditions.

3. Warm clothing suitable for immersion. Even though we are in the subtropical climate ....cooler water and strong winds increase the chill factor to alarming levels.

I liked the end quote " practice , practice , practice because we are all just between swims"

http://gokayaknow.com/index.php/kayakin ... ou-paddle/

The link below also tries to show the power of the sea in rough conditions....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t3cdCvKX ... e=youtu.be

...interesting!

Cheers Ian"

DITTO Ian. Practice, practice, practice.
 
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Not taking anything away from your thread K1but I'm pretty sure BOM got the S2H forecast right. They just ignored it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
nezevic said:
Not taking anything away from your thread K1but I'm pretty sure BOM got the S2H forecast right. They just ignored it.
You are correct Jon. The storm warning was issued just after the race started. http://passingparade-2009.blogspot.com. ... water.html Some took the decision to run to safety, while others proceeded, thinking that running north may have been more dangerous.

The footage is terrifying.


Paul Davidson (the winchman) wrote a book about his experience.


One of the chopper pilots, a Canadian, won an international award for his role. Hovering at sea is difficult because of the tipping horizon, but in 70 knots + it is an unbelievable feat.

Back on topic, it can happen to us, even a kilometre offshore. I personally have been out in predicted 10 - 15 knots, and experienced closer to 25 knots. However, BOM usually gets it right, or as right as you can expect, and I base that on thousands of hours at sea. If it ends up they are out only 10 knots above the forecast wind, that can make a huge difference to conditions, and that is trouble for yakkers. Hence the need to practice re-entries in rough conditions.
 

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Back off topic, there is an excellent book by Rob Mundle called "Fatal storm" that covers the 1998 race. Puckering stuff.

Back on topic, I'd listen to anything Mr Sunderland has to say on the topic of kayaking. He's been round the block as it were.

Carry on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
TheFishinMusician said:
Back off topic, there is an excellent book by Rob Mundle called "Fatal storm" that covers the 1998 race. Puckering stuff.

Back on topic, I'd listen to anything Mr Sunderland has to say on the topic of kayaking. He's been round the block as it were.

Carry on.
Yes and Yes. In 1998, if it hadn't been for the choppers, the number of fatalities would have been a lot higher.
 

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Yep, I remember one of the chopper pilots saying he had 90ft of winch cable out with some stupid amount of forward speed just to hold station, not quite touching the water & he had to climb rather quick because he looked up & saw a wave coming that was higher than he was!
That & the bloke that landed on a football field somewhere near lakes & ran out of fuel 30 secs later.

I was camping @ the time with one of the dudes from RFD liferafts when his phone started going off the hook.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here is Paul's book Mark.

http://www.lowelltarling.com.au/books/end_wire.html

If I remember, after about 8 rescues Paul performed, including swimming to persons through 80 ' waves, being dragged underwater by the winch rope, he could finally do no more and began vomiting uncontrollably. Top marks to Paul, and all the aircrew involved (the EMS guys), who saved so many lives on those two days, but not just then, but everyday. Hellava job.
 
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