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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got home on saturday monring after my first trip out in the kayak and I gave all the tackle a quick once over with the hose like i always do. I've just gone to use one of my combos for a quick flick and it jammed up.
So i guess my question is how the hell do i clean it and strip it down?
And am i going to have to do this everytime i go out in the yak?
 

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Rik, a couple of our members do, or did, work in tackle shops (Scott and keljad). You would need to give us a bit more detail to identify your particular problem. A few points though:

* this is not normal, I haven't had a reel seize on me despite many misadventures

* hosing reels is NOT recommended, unless with a fine mist spray to rinse off salt and dirt. Water with any force can drive salt and other particles into the reel and cause problems (this may be your issue, but I can't say)

* many reels are relatively easy to strip down for a basic clean and grease. Read manufacturers warnings before doing this as introducing the wrong materials into some parts of the reel, especially the drag and the antireverse can cause them to stop working. This includes oil and grease. This is very specific to models of reel, which is why it is important to read manufacturer guidelines. If you stay away from the drag and the antireverse, you should be able to partially disassemble the reel, gently rinse, wipe out any moisture and apply the recommended oil or grease. I also stay away from the bail mechanism as there are springs involved and I'm likely to lose one when disassembling, then not be able to reassemble properly
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi peril g'day mate. I do hose it with the finies spray and only very little power........but ive got a question peril.........do i use wd 40 to clean off all the old oil? and do i need a special oil to put on the reel?
The reason im asking is cos my reel see sat on the kitchen table in about 40 bits :? I hope i remeber where it all goes.
Sorry mate i get a bit ahead of myself.
The reel is a little Akuma Force.
And as for stay away from the drag and bail arm thats to later.
I already took the arm apart thinking it needed to come off for me to take the reel apart. but ive put that back to gether now :lol:
 

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Rik, I'm at the limit of my knowledge here. I was warned to stay away from WD-40. It is not a pure lubricant and can have a corrosive effect. Tackle stores typically sell reel lube, which is a lightweight grease that can be applied to the main gears, drive etc. I spray other parts of the reel, including the exterior moving parts, with Inox, available from hardware stores including major chains, after the reels have dried after every trip.

As you've already strip it down, use metho to clean all the parts, making sure not to leave behind fibres from cloth or paper towel, lube and reassemble. I've found in the past that the anti-reverse is the trickiest part of reassemble, which I why I suggested you avoid it when disassembling. Good luck. Remember, it is cheaper to swallow your pride and take the parts to your tackle store for reassembly than to buy a new reel :wink:
 

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Hi Rik, i've got an older shimano reel and find that it starts to play up after every 2 or 3 trips out in the yak (corrosion/salt). I have had my reel just about fully seize up the day after a trip out where it got particularly soaked.

I, like you, took the plunge and pulled every single possible part out of my reel in order to find the problem... all of Perils tips are good ones. Also i'll add its very handy to have the manual with the technical drawing there - if you don't have the manual the internet is a handy place for finding them. After you do it a couple of times it becomes pretty routine and a lot more convenient than having to put it in to be serviced all the time.

Also some people use poly pipe in the rod holders to effectively extend the rod holder and elevate the reel out of the splash zone a little more. Has to be a good idea.

edit: just read perils second post. I use a product called Lanotec to lube up parts externally (ie just give a little spray into the moving areas after rinsing it down). However this worries me spraying it near the line because of the smell it may give off when fishing/effects on the line? Someone needs to cross an effective lube spray with a fishing scent spray :lol:

Internally I use reel grease I bought in a tackle shop. Lesson I learnt my first time is that it only requires a light coating on the moving parts rather than packing it in to every spare cavity.

Re: the anti-reverse...this is the part that always plays up on my reel (and also the part i needed to consult the internet for after pulling it apart the first time :oops: ). I'm not sure if mine is a simple set up or not but after pulling it apart once or twice you soon get the hang of where the springs/lever bits go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
lmao i was thinking that too........there is a guy around the corner that repairs and clean reels rods etc.
I took the reel apart and stright away though this might need to go in a glad bag and taken to him to get put back together.
But thanks for all your help peril. im off out now to get the grease and metho. wish me luck
 

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Rik, here is an extract from an old article I did for Tas Fishing and Boating mag. I hope you find it helpful. Here goes;

Correct fishing reel maintenance and servicing procedures are something that is of prime importance to all anglers regardless of the type of reel used or the reel’s application. A well maintained reel performs at its optimum level and assists the angler by operating without a fault whilst fishing, having a smooth drag with a light initial let off to respond to a sudden run from a hooked fish.

These qualities will also greatly increase an angler’s enjoyment while fishing as we go fishing to fight the fish, not our equipment. A well maintained reel also outlasts a poorly maintained reel which is another excellent reason to perform these simple basic steps. In this article I will discuss the maintenance procedures which apply to the threadline or eggbeater type of reel which is by far the most popular type of reel used in Australia.

Daily maintenance procedures

Several simple steps should be observed and completed at the end of each days fishing. Firstly if the reel has been used in a saltwater environment and there was either a sea breeze or the reel was placed in a rod holder or rocket launcher while travelling from spot to spot in the boat it will have had salt spray collected on the outside of the reel housing. This salt spray firstly needs to be removed.

The thing not to do here is to throw the reel into a bucket of water or to lay the rod and reel down on the grass and blast it with the hose. The reason you do not simply throw the reel into a bucket of water is because by doing this the inside of the reel will fill up with freshwater which will begin to break down the reels internal lubrication.

The reason for not laying a reel down on the ground and just blasting it with the hose is because by lying the reel down on its side and then hosing the reel will result in the salt being absorbed by the water. This water will be forced into the inside of the reel through the gap between the rotor and the top of the housing where it will firstly break down the reel’s internal lubrication and then when the water evaporates, leave the salt inside the reel where it is now in with the unprotected bearings and gearing which have become unprotected when the reel’s internal lubrication has broken down.

Now that we know how not to remove this salt, what is the right way to remove it? Firstly leave the reel on the rod, and either hold the rod in your hand with the tip facing the 12 o’clock position or place the rod in a flush mount rod holder. The reason for this is simple. A threadline reel is designed to be used with the spool facing upwards. This results in the water running down the reel rather than into the reel if a fine spray is used. Using a dustpan brush, and some warm soapy water, thoroughly scrub the outside of the reel, starting at the top of the spool and the line and working your way downwards paying special attention to around the screw heads, bail arm and other places where salt can become trapped and build up.

The next procedure is to tighten up the drag to prevent water from getting into the drag. Adjust your hose so that it is spraying out a light mist just sufficient to wash off the soap. Either dry the reel or leave the reel outside to dry. Do not store the reel while still wet and when storing reels, store them in neoprene or cloth bags that breathe and allow the moisture to evaporate. Fully loosen off your drag as this will prevent your drag washers from compressing and contribute to a smooth drag.
Next oil the handle knob, preferably using a Teflon based lubricant such as Triflow for example with a lightweight sewing machine oil being acceptable. Also oil the line roller by particularly or fully unscrewing the line roller screw and using one of the oils mentioned previously. This is of particular importance with reels featuring ball bearing line rollers.

Annual maintenance procedures

Your reel will require a full service every 6-12 months depending on usage. This is achieved by fully dissembling the reel, removing all of the old lubricants as well as any salt or foreign matter before relubricating and reassembling the reel. This is easier than it sounds because threadline reels are simple to disassemble and reassemble if care is taken and the parts are laid out systematically in the same order ands the same side up as which they were removed from the reel.

Firstly remove the spool by undoing the drag knob all of the way or by pushing the spool release button on reels offering this feature. Remove the drag washers and noting their sequence in which they were removed from the reel. Next remove the handle and oil the handle knob.

Remove the side plate screws and loosen the rotor nut which will be visible with the spool removed and feature the shaft running up through it. With the rotor nut loosened off, the side plate should be able to be removed. This will expose the gearing and the oscillation system of the reel. Spin the rotor until the main shaft is at the bottom of the stroke. This will expose the screw which retains the main shaft.

Remove the main shaft and the main gear. Remove the rotor. Once the rotor is removed, the bail system can be disassembled and cleaned as can the line roller and its bush or bearing. Higher end reels these days utilise a two speed or worm drive oscillation. This looks like and operates in the same manner as a level wind on an overhead reel.

When disassembling a worm drive oscillation reel, be careful that when it comes time to reassemble the oscillating system that the pawl and worm is lightly oiled and the pawl is tracking along the length of the level wind worm before tightening the pawl cover. Remove the screws retaining the ball bearing or one way roller bearing cover and remove the bearing(s) and the pinion gear.

The reel is now fully disassembled. To service the reel, remove all old lubrication and foreign materials, cleaning the parts just before they are installed back into the reel. To clean your bearings, the old lubricants can be removed by soaking in acetone and once the acetone is evaporated using compressed air to blow out any grit or sand. Do not use ait from an air compressor as this has moisture in the lines, use compressed ait that comes in an aerosol can from computer shops and which is used to clean peripheral devices.

Oil the bearings using a light oil such as Triflow or Lanaguard although again a light sewing machine oil will suffice at a pinch if this is all that is available. Lightly grease all gearing and moving metal parts using a lightweight reel grease, preferably one containing Teflon. Apply all lubricants sparingly, just a light coverage on all surfaces where necessary. Oil the oscillating system paying particular attention to the bushes or bearings as well as the worm and pawl on reels featuring two speed oscillating systems.

Reassembly is the reverse procedure to disassembling with the addition of cleaning and lubricating the various components as the reel is assembled. By laying the parts out in the right order and facing the same direction as which they were removed from the reel you can not get into any trouble. When I used to perform this service for customers, as I was always overwhelmed with work I used to say to them, give it a go if you get stuck bring it into me disassembled making sure not to loose any parts. It was rare to get a customer who needed to bring one in when they laid the parts systematically in front of them as they removed them as they could always work out where those parts went.

There is one exception where you should throw your reel into a bucket of freshwater. This is when the reel has been fully submerged in saltwater and it should be thrown into a bucket of freshwater and left there until the reel is serviced as it will not start to rust or corrode until removed from the freshwater.

Summary

Using the correct maintenance procedures will add years to the life of your favourite reel and ensure that it doesn’t let you down when you have hooked that trophy fish. You will gain far more enjoyment from your fishing when not struggling with a reel that isn’t performing at its optimum level. When your tackle is performing at its optimum level, fishing is far more enjoyable and stress free. These simple do’s and don’ts detailed below will keep your tackle performing at its optimum level.

Simple do’s and don’ts

Do always keep your reel clean and dry
Do regularly oil your handle knob and line roller
Do ensure your reel is fully serviced once or twice a year.
Do back your drag off after each fishing trip
Do remove saltwater spray from the exterior of the fishing reel using the methods previously mentioned.

Don’t throw the reel in a bucket of water
Don’t hose your reel using high pressure sprays or when the reel is laying on the ground.
Don’t use WD/CRC types of sprays as these are actually penetrating solvents and will begin to break down the reel’s internal lubrication.
Don’t store your reel in plastic or non breathable bags particularly when wet.

Catch ya Scott
 

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Don’t use WD/CRC types of sprays as these are actually penetrating solvents and will begin to break down the reel’s internal lubrication.
Agree with all Scott has to say, but while I would not use WD40/CRC on the reel have always given the reel and line a light puff with Inox since it came on the market about 10 years ago.

It has a different smell to similar products and hasn't appeared to be detrimental to the gear or line
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all your input guys.
Ive fixed it now and its as good as new. And it only took me 2 or 10 goes to get it right, plus i got the wrong grease first time and had to clean it all off and start again :lol:
But all said and done i think i could take the thing apart with my eyes closed.
That little force is as hard as nails thou. ive had it almost 10 months and it never had any problems and ive dropped it countless time on the floor and in salt water and a little spray when i got home was all i waas doing.
 

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When I get back from a trip I put my rods in their holders and give them a light spray as I give my kayak its 30 second washdown. I have recently taken on Scotts advice and tighten the drag before the light spray and then loosen it off again.

I am also a fan of using Inox. Interestingly, in the manual for my new Shimano Charter Special it recommends spraying the reel with WD40/CRC :?: I have used Inox instead.

Regards
Grant
 

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I strip and clean my reels (shimano overheads and old mitchell threadlines) about once a year. A few tips. Firstly, while you can use acetone or carburettor cleaner to strip old lubricant, be very careful of plastic parts as these solvents may dissolve them. Test first! Secondly, if you're unfamiliar with the internals of a reel, take numerous digital photos as you dismantle, so that you have a reference for reassembly. Also, when reassembling drag mechanisms, make sure you know which washers etc should be greased and which should be left dry. Getting this wrong can seriously degrade drag performance.
 

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My reels jam up after a good dunking. Previous posts explain the detail put my number one tip is go to the chemist and in ya purtiest voice ask for a packet of disposible maskara brushes. These thing are frigging magic for cleaning reels. They can get in anywhere.
 

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Ditto,especially Dodge's..fish don't mind inox
1.wash reel
2.take off spool to expose stick..inox inside clip that holds drag in spool
3.loosen nut at base of tin stick-very important to loosening up reels
4.spray inox
5.wait a day
6.put it back together
7.loosen cracks/gaps/screws...inox/oil/grease-e.g.if it looks black and yuck=grease it...retighten...rub greasy stuff off on brother's tshirt...
Hey presto!Works for me!
johnny
 
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