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And then they have this piece:
Opinion: Conservation shouldn't be a dirty word By Martin Salter

From what I've read recently I really worry that some of you guys are in real danger of losing public and political support by vacating the moral high ground in favour of an unedifying shitfight with the pros to see who can catch the last fish in the ocean. I fully expect a majority of the commercial sector and those who are paid to advocate for them to argue for their unalienable right to catch what they want, where they want and how they want, irrespective of the impacts on either the environment or on the 4 million Aussies who enjoy recreational fishing. This is not just an Australian thing, for they've done it the world over.

Witness the raping of the impoverished West African fisheries by the very super trawlers that Tony Abbott wants to allow to operate in your waters. Look at the collapse of the once prolific cod fisheries of the Newfoundland Grand Banks in Canada, the near destruction of the North American striped bass fishery, or, nearer to my home, the appalling over fishing of the North Sea as a result of the idiotic European Common Fisheries Policy.

The lessons from these disasters are crystal clear. In the race to the bottom everyone loses and it is only by the introduction and enforcement of rigorous sustainable fishery management practices on all sectors that stock collapses can be avoided or recovery measures allowed to succeed. And that means bag and size limits, commercial quotas and gear restrictions, protected nursery areas and spatial closures to assist successful recruitment. It means managing our fisheries for tomorrow and recognising that we do not have the luxury of an inexhaustible resource. And here's the rub - I also firmly believe that those of us who fish for fun rather than for our livelihoods need to be prepared to lead the way in best practice and to be out there making the case for the best possible conservation practices. It would be great to see the pros rallying to the same cause, perhaps some will but I'm not holding my breath.
My worry is that you guys are about to blow it.
Is he talking to the Australian fishing public as a whole - or to Fisho?
 

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From what I can tell they're talking about commercial fisherman in both instances. One would have to assume they are both registered and doing everything by the book....which they are entitled to do.

Is it a good look? Not in the eyes of a recreational fisherman who would be lucky to catch a single one of either specimen in a whole year of fishing.

Is it wrong? The age old debate of whether we should be harvesting wild stocks of seafood.

One interesting observation is the disconnect between what we do as individuals and what that translates to at a macro level. When we think of our own demand for resources, we think of very small quantities of anything. If any of us were to visit a battery factory, an LNG plant, a chicken processor, a sugar mill, an illegal sawmill in Indonesia, we'd probably be shocked at the scale of what is happening. When Joe Blow buys his handful of cheap 50c garden stakes from wherever he doesn't see the hordes of people wanting off into the forests of Sumatra to chop down the primary product that the white man in town is going to pay them handsomely for.

I have relative who don't fish and go,to the supermarket to buy their fish. The photos shown above are what needs to happen so people who don't catch their own fish can buy it. Whether you buy fish and chips or eat coral trout at a fancy restaurant, there are big arse boats going out every day to try catch that product. As recreational fisherman we're not used to seeing the industrial version of our sport. Maybe that is partly the reason for our disgust when we see that number of dead fish.

We are happy to tell the world about environmentally aware we are as fisherman but would be horrified at the sight of pollution being released to the environment at the lead smelter that produced the lead our jig heads are made from.
 

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Trying to work this out. That tuna pic was catch not waste? Nothing wrong with it as long as they fish the rules. We can always discuss the rules.

The Mulloway pic? Different. That's pure waste and whether they were within the rules or not it's offensive.
 

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The first pic is from my home harbour. The co-op processes the fish quickly. The old tractor brings the load from the ice boxes or holds of the vessel to the co-op at the end of the wharf. Prime tuna is tested and cleaned and iced in a cardboard coffin for airfreight to Japan as soon as. Yellowfin tuna shown in that pic maybe destined for cat food for all that i now.

As Con has so eloquently explained, the industrial version of fishing can often be an afront to the rec angler.

Our commercial fishos are regulated but heh not everyone is squeaky clean on the regs. Fortunately most probably are. However the commentator indicates several other fisheries in the world that have been degraded to an appalling extent. Left unchecked the same could happen in Australia however our fisheries are supposedly well regulated.

The comments on the mulloway pic in the Fisho mag link were interesting. To me the one about the impact of prawn trawling on juvenile mulloway seems of interest as the point was made that the catch of large mulloway in the northern NSW rivers has been going on for years and seems sustainable. To me the two points seem to be at odds with one another.

When it comes to 'wild harvest' my belief is that unless there is considerable oversight by an independent body then disaster is inevitable. One huge problem maybe the lack of scientifc data on particular fish stocks and the extent to which they are in fact sustainable. Another impact is of course the interplay between commercial fishing and recreational fishing. Another is the unintended by-catch of commercial fishing.

Many people are shocked by the visual image of fish lying on a tarp on the lawn such as shown in the mulloway pix but the same people and many others have not a clue about what has been happening for years along the sea bed on the continental shelf and the extent to which technology assists the commercial fishos.

But to Anselmo's question about Fisho's flag waving and the author's comment. I believe that the author is directing the comment to us the public. May be time for me to make a comment on recreational fishing bag limits.

cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
robsea said:
The first pic is from my home harbour. The co-op processes the fish quickly. The old tractor brings the load from the ice boxes or holds of the vessel to the co-op at the end of the wharf. Prime tuna is tested and cleaned and iced in a cardboard coffin for airfreight to Japan as soon as. Yellowfin tuna shown in that pic maybe destined for cat food for all that i now.

As Con has so eloquently explained, the industrial version of fishing can often be an afront to the rec angler.

Our commercial fishos are regulated but heh not everyone is squeaky clean on the regs. Fortunately most probably are. However the commentator indicates several other fisheries in the world that have been degraded to an appalling extent. Left unchecked the same could happen in Australia however our fisheries are supposedly well regulated.

The comments on the mulloway pic in the Fisho mag link were interesting. To me the one about the impact of prawn trawling on juvenile mulloway seems of interest as the point was made that the catch of large mulloway in the northern NSW rivers has been going on for years and seems sustainable. To me the two points seem to be at odds with one another.

When it comes to 'wild harvest' my belief is that unless there is considerable oversight by an independent body then disaster is inevitable. One huge problem maybe the lack of scientifc data on particular fish stocks and the extent to which they are in fact sustainable. Another impact is of course the interplay between commercial fishing and recreational fishing. Another is the unintended by-catch of commercial fishing.

Many people are shocked by the visual image of fish lying on a tarp on the lawn such as shown in the mulloway pix but the same people and many others have not a clue about what has been happening for years along the sea bed on the continental shelf and the extent to which technology assists the commercial fishos.

But to Anselmo's question about Fisho's flag waving and the author's comment. I believe that the author is directing the comment to us the public. May be time for me to make a comment on recreational fishing bag limits.

cheers
Some good points rob, but those yellowfin have clearly not been treated for the Japanese market

I guess my main gripe is that the pros are acting legally by doing this, but is it morally right or ethically right?
Especially when you consider the way the fish have been treated post capture
They've all been dumped and left to suffocate - that's clearly evident from the posture of the fish

They are going to taste like sh*t for whoever buys and eats them
If the pros have to pillage like the to feed joe public, then shouldn't they treat the catch better?
It shows a lack of respect not only to the end consumer and to the fish themselves, but a total lack of foresight both short term for maximising the market price, but also long term for the sustainability of the capture and market
 

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I often wonder how anyone knows what sustainable is. Is it when an industry keeps harvesting the same among every year? Is it based on counting how many fish there are out there? How do you count fish and, if it's sustainable, how does natural reproduction speed up to make up for what is being harvested? Does sustainable just mean that we might run out in 20 years instead of 2?

I reckon, regardless of what we think, net fishing etc will continue for as long as people want to buy fish. Can you believe that the fact that people want to feed tuna and sardines to their cats there are forklifts running around on wharves carting away fish as shown in the above photos. Think about that, who is going to stop buying cat food for their cat?
 

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Barrabundy said:
I often wonder how anyone knows what sustainable is. Is it when an industry keeps harvesting the same among every year? Is it based on counting how many fish there are out there? How do you count fish and, if it's sustainable, how does natural reproduction speed up to make up for what is being harvested? Does sustainable just mean that we might run out in 20 years instead of 2?

I reckon, regardless of what we think, net fishing etc will continue for as long as people want to buy fish. Can you believe that the fact that people want to feed tuna and sardines to their cats there are forklifts running around on wharves carting away fish as shown in the above photos. Think about that, who is going to stop buying cat food for their cat?
Very good point ref cat food, if you showed cat owners the photos of the tuna and said "this is your cat food, you should stop buying it as it is wasteful and destructive" they would look at you as if you are mad. It would be like a vegetarian coming up to me and saying I should not eat steak and showing me a photo of a dead cow. I would still go home and have a steak.

Another very good point, a sustainable fishery? How does anyone know what is going to be sustainable. The special interst group with money will most likely get what they want and it will take a long time to change it. Super trawlers have lobbiest's who tell politicians how much tax revenue it will create, jobs will be created, infrastructure, money being spent in the community etc but is it good for the environment / country in the long term? Probably not......
 

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I'm passionate about these issues and at the same time resigned to the worst case scenario.

Consumers sometimes win small battles. They might get a minor win when it comes to information on packaging or sweat shops in Bangladesh every now and then, but in reality the true power lies with whoever can deliver profits and whoever can convince government that those profits outweigh the environmental damage. I don't see rec fishers, conservationists or consumers winning those arguments any time soon.

The legality of the practice is neither here nor there. Slavery was once legal. What is law and what is not is usually only defined by the prevailing will (or lack of) at that time and place.

What I know for sure is that rec-fisho's will never be able to take the high ground on these issues if the images of livebaiting, half a dozen 20 year old bream (hardly a great table fish) gutted for consumption or indiscriminate gaffing are still acceptable.
 

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The part that makes me sick as well is the fact we're only seeing the fish they catch and not the by-catch they throw dead overboard.
 
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