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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last night we got called to a house fire and thought this may be a timely warning.

You have all heard and seen the adds about "Get Down Low and Go" this is the reason why.
Have a look at the Picture below and take note of the clean wall at around knee level. There it is in a nut shell, clean, cooler air, air that you can breath to live .
Thats the level where the smoke has come down to.



The other thing in the above picture is the TV sets plastic sound. It has started to melt at or just below shoulder level . That means the heat down to there was above probably 150 heading on to over 200 degrees, about 1 minute later it may well have been down to the clear air line and gone boom, flashover it's called. It's when all the gear in the room hits it's flashpoint and just explodes.Thats the easy way to explian it.



Above is the front room in the house and by the look of it that's what has happened here, notice no line. The smoke has totally filled the room from top to bottom.

Only reason i have put this here is that lately we have ahd kitchen fire after kitchen fire and now this bad one.

Make sure the smoke detectors are working, you have an escape plan with at least 2 exits. the escape plan includes the evac /meeting point outside so that when the firery's get there they either know everyone is safe cos you are all there or you know that someone is inside and they need to go in and look for them and lastly practice it .

No one was hurt in this fire.

Just for Gatesy.
 

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Thanks Pete for such a graphic example of the crawl to escape business.

Years ago I had my grandson crawling to the front and back doors as fire drill with eyes closed, and the family thought I was mad; your photo will be shoved down their collective throats when they visit next :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It's one of the best pics ive seen for a while that shows this . We will be using it for training purposes.
 

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Thanks for the warning Pete,

We have a Fire Safety guy how comes in and trains our Management Team here at work for evacuating our building, brilliantly funny little scottish fellow.

The funny thing is everytime we train he says "forget about work, make sure you and your family know how to evacuate your house by atleast 3 different routes"

Those pictures really do illsutrate why he says that quite well
 

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Pete,

Have you heard al the hype about the two different types of smoke detectors. ACA or one of those other rubbish shows apparently said that the most commonly used smoke detector particle something or other (i.e. the one with the radiation sticker on it) is useless and the photoelectric type is the only ones to use. Now as a responsible homeowner my house is has smoke alarms however all alarms are the partial types.

Should I be worried?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hmm technical stuff eh. :roll:

Here goes.
The standard smoke alarm that we all know will detect small smouldering fires (no flame) as it detects the smoke particles and not the flame. However if you have a very clean burning fire at the other end of the house within view of the detector it won't go off till it detects smoke.

It depends what type of photoelctric type they are talkin about. One sends beams out and when the beam is interupted in any way by the smoke it will go off. ( simplified)

The other detects the flame itself, not smoke. So you could have a house full of smoke and if there is no fire that the detector can see (fire in laundry) then it won't go off and you won't wake up. If you do awaken then the fire may well be on the way to wrecking alot of stuff before the firey's get there.

Untill someone like the fire authorities say that they are or are not safe i would keep using what you have , as long as it's properly maintained , tested etc. I guess there is a place for both
 

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Peter,
Thats an excellent reminder of the need to be ever vigilant especially at home where we are usually blasé.

Having done half a dozen advanced fire fighting courses, operating in rooms that are smoke filled and being licked by flames I can appreciate the dangers associated, but I cant imagine the horror of finding that occur in my own home.

Cheers,
Jake
 

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Very interesting and thought provoking.

I think to reduce the risk of fires in the home, one should:

(1) go yakking more as this decreases time in house
(2) eat out so kitchen is not used as much
(3) spend more time in shed/garage making yak accessories or cleaning fishing gear as per reason in (1).
(4) Can't think of anything for 4 but it must be there somewhere.
(5) Spend spare time in tackle shops and yak shops as per reason in (1).
 
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