Kayak and Fishing Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I make Turkish bread every weekend. pulled the recipe off the SBS website.
Ingredients

1 tablespoon (2 x 7 g sachets) dried yeast
pinch of caster sugar
375 ml warm water
480 g strong bread flour
1 teaspoon salt
60 ml extra-virgin olive oil
2 free-range eggs
50 ml milk
nigella or sesame seeds
View conversion table
Preparation

Dissolve the yeast and sugar in 125 ml of the warm water and set aside in a warm place for about 10 minutes until frothy. Use your fingers to work 90g of the flour into the yeast to make a sloppy paste. Sprinkle lightly with a little more flour, then cover with a tea towel and set aside in a warm place for 30 minutes to form a 'sponge'.

Put the remaining flour and the salt into a large bowl. Make a well in the centre and add the sponge, oil and remaining water. Use your fingers to work it to a soft, sloppy dough. Don't panic: it is meant to be very sticky!

Transfer to an electric mixer fitted with a dough hook and knead on a low speed for 10-15 minutes until very smooth and springy. Transfer to a lightly oiled bowl, then cover with a damp tea towel and leave to rest at room temperature for 1 hour or until doubled in size. (From this point you can proceed to bake the pide bread or filled pide boats. You can also refrigerate the dough until you are ready to use it. It will keep for around 24 hours, but take it out of the refrigerator a good 3 hours before you want to use it, to give it time to return to room temperature slowly.)

When ready to bake the bread, preheat the oven to its highest setting with two pizza stones or oiled baking sheets in it. Divide the dough in two, then form into rounds and leave, covered, to rest for 30 minutes. Mix the eggs and milk to make an egg wash. Place the dough on a lightly floured work surface. Use the heels of your hands to press and flatten each piece of dough out to a 20 cm oval.

Brush the surface liberally with the egg wash. Dip your fingertips into the egg wash and mark rows of deep indentations across and down the length of the dough, leaving a narrow border. Now comes the tricky bit. Lightly flour the hot pizza stones or trays. Lift on the pides, stretching them gently and evenly. Sprinkle with nigella or sesame seeds and bake for 8-10 minutes until crisp and golden brown.

http://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipe/976/T ... pide_dough
Really tasty. I've already made some this weekend. If i remember, i'll take a photo next weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,270 Posts
I baked banana bread and rock cakes this afternoon.

Never baked much until I bought a Thermomix. Those things are the bomb. Even a numbat like me can cook with one of them
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
leftieant said:
With cold temps, I'm having issues getting a consistent prove (rise) - process at the moment is to flick the oven onto the 'defrost' setting to warm it, then flick back to the 'keep warm' setting (fan only) and prove in a pyrex bowl. This still seems to be too warm.
I've been sitting the proving bowl in the sink with some lukewarm water. Put a tea towel over the top. Nice and warm. Easy to control the temp by adding hot or cold water.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
nezevic said:
leftieant said:
With cold temps, I'm having issues getting a consistent prove (rise) - process at the moment is to flick the oven onto the 'defrost' setting to warm it, then flick back to the 'keep warm' setting (fan only) and prove in a pyrex bowl. This still seems to be too warm.
I've been sitting the proving bowl in the sink with some lukewarm water. Put a tea towel over the top. Nice and warm. Easy to control the temp by adding hot or cold water.
If your hot water system is accessible then just sit it on top of that in a bowl with a damp tea towel covering. Gives a nice constant temp with no fuss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,364 Posts
Does pizza dough count? A very simple recipe we use is two parts flour (don't ask me what type) and one part plain yoghurt. Mix it all up and flatten it out for fantastic pizza base.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,098 Posts
My tip for baking bread.
Get your 12 year old interested in it and then tell him it's his job to knead the dough.
He does a better job than me and I don't get sore wrists any more.
We usually only bother when we've run out of bread and the shops aren't close enough to drive to, but it does taste good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,221 Posts
I cheat.
I've had a bread machine for about 3 years now and haven't bought bread for that long.
I've tried (succeeded mostly) a bunch of different breads and doughs (pizza, dinner rolls, cinnamon rolls, ham and swiss rolls). I love the smells, the science experiment nature, and the no fuss, no mess machine.

One tip I can offer, is bread making is extremely affected by humidity. I've found the days I'm least likely to want to make bread (sunny, warm and dry) are the best for making bread. And those days I'm cooped up inside due to weather, inclined for a project of making bread, are the worst days. You really have to be aware of the humidity and alter the amount of water slightly, accordingly. I can follow a general bread recipe using the same batch of yeast to the µg and have different results. Too much h2o and the top falls in. Not aesthetic but it tastes the same, anyway.

2nd tip. Don't use iodized salt. Iodine is an antibiotic. Yeast is a biotic.

I've made campstove/Dutch oven bread a few times, too and that is awesome, but it takes an overnight proof. Here's that recipe:

Ingredients

17 1/2 ounces bread flour, plus extra for shaping
1/4 teaspoon active-dry yeast (this is very little yeast.
2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
12 ounces filtered water
2 tablespoons cornmeal

Directions

Whisk together the flour, yeast and salt in a large mixing bowl. Add the water and stir until combined. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and allow to sit at room temperature for 19 hours.

After 19 hours, turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Punch down the dough and turn it over onto itself a couple of times. Cover with a tea towel and allow to rest 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, shape the dough into a ball. Coat hands with flour, if needed, to prevent sticking. Sprinkle the tea towel with half of the cornmeal and lay the dough on top of it, with the seam side down. Sprinkle the top of the dough with the other half of the cornmeal and cover with the towel. Allow to rise for another 2 to 3 hours, or until the dough has doubled in size.

Outdoor coals: Heat charcoal in a chimney starter [I used wood coals] until ash covers all of the coals. Place 20 to 24 coals on a Dutch oven table. Place a cooling rack (or other wire rack that is at least 2-inches high) directly over the coals. Set a 5-quart Dutch oven on top of this rack and allow to preheat during the last 30 minutes of the second rise. Carefully transfer the dough to the Dutch oven and cover with the lid. Place 20 coals on top. Bake until the bread reaches an internal temperature of 210 to 212 degrees F, about 45 minutes. Transfer the bread to a cooling rack and allow to cool at least 15 minutes before serving.

Really easy but like I said it takes time and forethought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
Ant,

That is one exquisite looking loaf there ....

salticrak said:
Vetkoek, from South Africa, a kind of fried bread dough, man it is good with curry mince or jam.

http://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j ... 3060,d.aGc
Aaaahhhh salti you beat me to it. Vetkoek is amazing. My highschool tuckshop used to sell it with mince or chicken mayo - they went down a treat.

I ll try get Nadia to make me some again and document it for the thread - Do you know anyone who knows how to catch fish - perhaps a Snapper filled vetkoek could work....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
systemtester said:
I always mess bread up (usually it chips teeth). I have a crack maybe once every 12 months but am looking at GF stuff these days and finding alternative to normal bread has been fun.
Sounds like you're using a Discworld dwarf bread recipe :) .

With regard to the GF stuff - have you found anything near as good as normal bread? My other half is gluten intolerant and we've never found anything GF that seems like real bread. Would be prepared to make our own if the quality was there but the few attempts some years ago were not much good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,743 Posts
Watching the 'Aurora' network on foxtel last night they had a short film on as part of their 2013 short film festival called 'The Bakers Club' or something like that. It was pretty funny, it immediately conjured images of this thread.

I'd love to be able to find a link for it to post on this thread but have searched this morning and can't find it anywhere.

Has anybody else seen it or know how I can find it on the interweb?

Kev
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top