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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
not the opposite to starboard... the red stuff.

After a few dangerous indiscretions as a kid I have spent a lifetime away from alcoholic beverages. I have occasionally had a small glass of tawny port though and its about the only drink that I like and even then a bottle of port will stay un-molested in my study for a very long time.

I was looking at the range of port in Coles a couple of days ago and there was a the usual offerings from 10 to 30 odd dollars but then there was a bottle in a presentation case... this one was a Penfolds grandfather port (I think I got that right) at $110- or there abouts. Can someone offer an explanation to a wine illiterate bloke as to what would make a port worth that much or is it just a case of good marketing? Anyone ever tried it and if so is it really worth the dollars???

cheers

John
 

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Sometimes the best wines come from very small batches which throws availability into the mix to set the price.
To be honest, there are plenty of good wines and ports out there that are affordable.
 

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koich said:
It starts your mower quicker.
And it kills the weeds at the same time

But seriously, it's a law of diminishing returns scenario

The difference between a $10 bottle and a $50 is marked
The difference between a $50 and a $100 bottle is much less, and IMHO you'd need to invest a fair amount of time and effort to devleop a trained palate to differentiate the subtle nuances between them
 

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Occy said:
Hi John. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Being special (ie aged, old, high quality, rare) is what it's all about. Personally I could never bring myself to pay that much for a bottle of port or any other wine for that matter, but many would.

I once tried a new release of the legendary Grange at Seppelts winery. It was selling for around $250 at the time but it was far too young to drink. Even the guy behind the counter found it undrinkable. But that was ten or more years ago now and that vintage has developed into one of the best Granges in the last few decades. Selling for a small fortune, now at close to $1000 (if you can find anyone willing to part with it) it would have been a very nice investment me thinks. Go figure.
Crushed ants, Occy?
 

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eagle4031 said:
My uncle who worked in the wine industry told me to rely on taste not price. He said you would be surprised at how good, and where the cheap wines come from
Think your uncle was a smart man eagle, have tried a few ports over the years including some pricey ones and find I can be very content to just drink a Morris cask.

Found it one time at a new mate's house, he poured us port from a top branded bottle and asked how we all enjoyed it, then an hour later pointed out it was Morris decanted into the other bottle.
 

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I only drink $100+ wine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The only reason I even tried port in the first place was because it was an ingredient need for a Peking Duck I was cooking. I asked the bottle shop bloke what would be a good port for cooking and got a lecture on only using a good drinking port if I wanted a good result with the duck and then suggested a cheaply priced brand saying it was better than most of the "big" names... Over the years I have tried a few - some good, some woeful - of the cheapies "Tall Ships" was pretty good and of the more pricy ones "Galway Pipe" is also rather nice. Won't bother naming the ones I thought were pretty crap...

cheers

John
 

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Junglefisher go and get some good $20 bottles and store then correctly for 5 years. You will then have the quality of a $100 bottle cos in most cases you are paying someone else to age it for you. Bloody good wines in Aust for $10-$15 too but its a matter of taste.
 

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suehobieadventure said:
Junglefisher go and get some good $20 bottles and store then correctly for 5 years. You will then have the quality of a $100 bottle cos in most cases you are paying someone else to age it for you. Bloody good wines in Aust for $10-$15 too but its a matter of taste.
I was fishing Sue.
I hardly ever spend more than $15 of wine. There's plenty of good wines for that price.
 

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Would also like to know if its anything special as I was given a bottle of Grandfather Port by a client around mid 90's. Never got to taste it though.
Being a non-drinker I was advised by someone more knowledgeable than me to store on its side in a cool dark cupboard and it would keep pretty much as long as it took for an occasion to arise to crack the seal. Did all that but when I went to retrieve it 13 years later and a few days before my wedding I found out it had been pilfered by a flatmate I had thought was a friend along with a number of other items and sold for a pittance.
Rob.
 

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G'day mate, most of the better quality Ports and Sherries or fortified wines come from low yeilding vines, they are generally hand pruned and the fruit hand picked, some vines will be over 50 years old, usually the Port in question has been in barrells for 10 years and every year the barells are topped up with this seasons vintage , so youré 15 yr old Grandfathers port has 15 years of different vintages in the one bottle !! (same block of grapes used year after year), winemakers also are quite picky over barrels used for their ports so some barrells can be very old French oak wich are quite valuable in themselves,like the Grange that Penfolds make old vines used year after year develop their own characters and thats what gets Winemakers excited and then the prices go up! really good Port or Sherry can easily be over $100 per bottle and worth every drop.....bit like trying to justify the price of a new FE Stella to the missus ..........

Cheers
 

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With port, the quality has as much, if not more to do with the brandy spirit than it does the quality of the wine.
Grandfather is not as good as you'd think.
Hanwood used to be a good drop for the price.

Seriously consider getting hold of some Tokay and Muscat from Rutherglen Victoria John. If you like port, you will drool over that stuff. Not that pricey either.
 

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Ado said:
Seriously consider getting hold of some Tokay and Muscat from Rutherglen Victoria John. If you like port, you will drool over that stuff. Not that pricey either.
I'll second that

My father inlaw got me into the Muscats from Rutherglen (and Durifs but that's another thread)

It's one of the oldest wine regions in the country and is one of the premier regions in the world for Tokay and Muscat.
 

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x3

the fortifieds are not really me. Taste is the right answer. Try decanting as someone said earlier and use good glasses. The sense of occasion helps too.

Knew a restaurant in London china tang in the Dorchester. Knew the manager. Plods would think nothing of ordering 1000 pound bottles of wine. Then have it served with chillie duck.

Stupid disregard for the effort required by most of us to earn a quid.
 
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