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Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby Squidley » Mon Sep 10, 2012 12:39 am

I'd been kicking tires at Binks every now and again, mainly checking out the Outback, seeing as it was a good looking fishing platform and fit neatly in the weird place I have to keep my kayak. And then Hobie come along with another few models in the 11-12 foot range with the PA 12 and the Revo 11. As the thing that I missed most with my existing kayak was speed and range, my heart was set on the zippy looking Revo 11. Further to the cause of extending my range and upping the speed, I went with the sail kit, plus sidekicks for when I'm too tied up with fishing gear to let out the sail in a timely fashion.

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Here it is about to be chewed in the shore break. More on that later

So what've you got did

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The cockpit with Everything, on a later test trip (test trips are where I don't catch much). Look how lovely and pointy that bow is.

Binks kindly installed a number of little things to get the boat the way I wanted it. Taking notes from Mingle, I got a pair of Scotty flush mounts installed near the rudder up/down controls, and with the articulated extender arms I'd already acquired, I can get a pair of rods into a nice trolling position clear of my knees, clear of my sail, and close enough to hand.

The rope and pulley you can see bungeed over the central hatch is part of the sail furler system that Binks introduced me to when I asked them about sail-rotating furlers (here it is being used: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zV_X6VAo9zw ). I liked the look of theirs as the rope that rotates the mast is an endless loop, rather than a second sheet to dangle and tangle. Initially the rope was a bit slippery on the mast pulley and didn't work too well, but the rope is beginning to roughen and bite more and in my last test I could furl the main in a couple of seconds. At this stage, the PVC pipe sleeve and second sheet furlers seem a bit quicker (here's Mingle using his: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AlWHnXg6800 ). As the intent is to stop the boat and control the sail when I hook a fish, speed is important! I'll have to see if I can shave a few seconds off as it is now. One other niggle is the circular cover around the pulley is wide enough that to access the front hatch, I need to lift the mast a few inches, but that might be a problem I'd face with other furling systems.

Binks fixed the sidekick crossbar just behind the seat, so as not to interfere with the wheels should I ever take them with me. This makes the outriggers pretty easy to access on the water, making offshore setup and packdown convenient, but it has made access to the lowest outrigger position a problem as I can't get my finger underneath to click the sidekick back out again. I'm more into going into the gulf with the sail up rather than standing up in an estuary and sight casting (and if I was into that I'd have got an Outback or a PA12) so the setting with the floats raised for low drag is all I really want out of them, but if you want low floats to make a nice raft for standing on, take care that there's some finger-space underneath the crossbar where the hole is.

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I have my FF head unit sitting on a RAM mount on a small ball diamond base fixed to the bottom of the right mesh pocket. A small bung hole was big enough to pass the plug through, and with some carved up kickboard foam stuffed in there, I can't see any gaps for much water to sneak in that way. I was worried the head unit would crowd my leg too much, but it's just out of the way enough that I can pedal as normal. I suppose if I had a larger head unit I could get a scotty/ram ball adapter and sacrifice a rod holder.

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Between the central hatch gear bucket, the mirage drive slot and the blocks of foam I've glued in there, I'm happy that the battery's not gonna move around too much. One day I'll get around to sealing it in a lunchbox so I don't run the risk of seawater closing a circuit over unfused terminals. Speaking of the gear bucket, wow, a central hatch is something I really missed not having in my other yak. Plenty of space in the bucket for all the tackle I'd ever take on a single trip, one less thing to reach into the rear well for! Also shown; a clam cleat for the main to keep me moving while my hands are busy managing lines.

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A wet mount just behind the mast step, so I can move the transducer to my old boat if I want.

So how does it go?

I foolishly took this new and unfamiliar boat fully rigged into a nasty little dumpy shore break and found out the hard way a few important things:
  • The Revo 11 turns as easily as a lazy susan without its rudder down, not that it should be down in a shore break because:
  • The salesman's gonna talk up the mirage drive and talk down the paddle but please use it to get past a shore break
  • Stash the outriggers in the rear well and blow them up and click them on once you're past the surf
  • If you do have them on prior and end up rolling on them, the "good" news is the (inexpensive) central crossbar will probably be the thing to break and not the hull or the outriggers themselves

With the outriggers unusable for now and stashed in my car, I persevered and attempted a second launch, this time with the paddle. This boat really wriggles along side to side with the rudder up but I got past the break fine this time around. It was a lumpy, breezy day, southerly felt like 12 knots and enough to blow up some whitecaps. I noticed straight away this boat was a little tippier than my Emotion Stealth Angler, but I relaxed quickly when I found it only went a few degrees either way before slowing right down. Although I left the outriggers behind, the sail was still on and I was happy to find using it was not as precarious as I anticipated. I had to loose the mainsheet a few times but I never came close to tipping over. My return journey was against the wind and racing sundown, but progress upwind didn't seem frustrating at the time, I think I even got through a few tacks without pedaling. I felt like the lovely pointy bow was doing its job cutting through chop, my Emotion yak has a broader nose that likes to go up and over rather than through and progress would be slow.

On returning to shore, I pulled the paddle out and clipped the rudder and drive up for a conservative and hopefully familiar landing. It really doesn't track as well like this as my last boat did, but although I ended up side on to a broken wave and felt a bit tippier than I'm used to, I succesfully braced and stayed upright. Perhaps I'm meant to leave the rudder down but uncleated so I come in straighter? Speaking of the rudder; very responsive. I suspect the reason the boat tracks so bad without it is so it responds straight away when it's down. Had to give it a lot of nudges to maintain a heading while sailing but I'll have to see if this is a fact of life, or something I can improve with technique.

My next trips were less hazardous, and I got to use the sidekicks along with the sail. Although sailing without them was feasible, they made it possible to ignore the mainsheet for a sec while I attended to the fishing. I'm going to put some kind of fairing in to guide the mainsheet around the rear well as I've had a few annoying snags where the sail stayed on longer than I'd like. Also, tying the end of the mainsheet to an outrigger, rather than leaving all the mainsheet trailing in the water while sailing close is something I'll try next; I had the end of the sheet snagged in the rudder momentarily at one point. Could've been quite a hassle!

I had my eye on the gps more on the the later trip, and I found that I was tacking through 140 degrees, taking into account the direction I was actually travelling (at about 3kph), not the way I was faced. I'm using standard fins at the moment (and a sailing rudder) but it seems to me I might really benefit from the turbos; presumably being larger and deeper they'll help reduce side-slip. It'll be interesting to measure the difference it makes, and see what else I can do to get a bit closer to the breeze.

Man oh man I can't wait to take this thing to KI in November
(via the ferry of course :D)
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Re: Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby Ado » Mon Sep 10, 2012 7:37 am

Great review Squidley. How long does it take to set up?
Adrian
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36cm Redfin, 58cm Golden Perch, 35cm Whiting, 38cm Tailor, 42cm Sand Flathead, 62cm Dusky Flathead, 32cm Snapper, 47cm Black Bream, 68cm Salmon, 30cm Flounder, 42cm Frigate Mackerel
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Re: Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby Squidley » Mon Sep 10, 2012 8:34 am

Thanks guys. Ado, most people could set up an AI in the time it takes me to double check everything, but I'd say that putting up the sail and popping on the outriggers (offshore) would take inside ten extra minutes for any Hobie owners looking at a sail kit. One thing that can hold you up is grit in the crossbar as the sidekicks are a snug fit in there; it's worth just running a finger through there before putting them on.

Nezevic, do you have the rudder down at all when you surf land with a paddle? I don't know if the Revolution 13 has the spinning quite as bad without a rudder down though.

I forgot to mention the seat. The adjustability is nice but the pedaling action definitely asks a bit more of the seat base than it has; I end up with quite a sore butt after a few hours and I understand why people replace or modify it. I'm going to try adding a piece of yoga matt under the base and see how that goes.
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Re: Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby tingles » Mon Dec 17, 2012 10:34 pm

Great report Squidley,

I have the Revo 13 with sail kit and sidekicks. Never landed in surf with sidekicks on but withrudder up the 13 turns side on pretty easy as well when coming into the beach- still working that one out. Heading out I have the mirage drive in and fins held up with the peddle bungee so when I get in I peddle like blazes to get clear of the waves. That way as soon as Im in I have propulsion and steering. PVC furler seems to work OK.

I absolutely love trolling under sail, except its often too fast for the areas I fish. Have sailed out from Horseshoe bay along in front of Boomers, and at Pt Fairy - two of my best kayak trips ever!

Cheers,

Dave
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Re: Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby Squidley » Wed Dec 19, 2012 3:50 pm

That's some nice looking coastline, Tingles. I wish I was there now. I've had problems myself with lures that want to go slower, but I find the Duel Aile Diet 90s & 70s and the hardcore minnow don't mind going fast. Mainly get snook but in KI recently it worked on salmon, trevally and big tommies too.
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Re: Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby Dewalt » Wed Dec 19, 2012 5:09 pm

Great reading Squidley, just bought the sail kit for my Pro Angler. Hopefully il get out to play with it over the chrissie period :)
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Re: Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby Squidley » Wed Dec 19, 2012 8:29 pm

Thanks Dewalt. Sail kit with a PA seat sounds heavenly, be sure to post how it goes. Hope I see you out there this summer :)
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Re: Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby Dewalt » Thu Dec 20, 2012 5:04 pm

Squidley wrote:Thanks Dewalt. Sail kit with a PA seat sounds heavenly, be sure to post how it goes. Hope I see you out there this summer :)


Sure will mate, i need to do a pictorial like yours as i have now put in a sliding pivot mount for the seat :) which i have raised a few inches and can face backwards :)

Sail raised, backwards facing seat gimble for fighting those huge Kalamarie :)
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Re: Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby captaincoochin » Fri Feb 08, 2013 4:27 pm

Thanks for the post mate. I recently bought a revo 11 and am considering the sail kit now. I carry a cooler bag in the front hatch and that extra 6-7 kg of ice/fish makes for a nice cruze through chop..
Pb- Jack 46, estuary cod 45, flathead 73, whiting 39, bream 38, grunter 41, trevally 35, sweetlip 40 , squire 49, kingy 45, school Mack 50, spotted Mack 67, reef shark 99 bass 47, yellowbelly 46, tilapia 42,

Tristan.
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Re: Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby Squidley » Fri Feb 08, 2013 7:12 pm

No worries! If you make or buy some kind of furling mechanism for the sail, it'll get in the way of opening the front hatch. I had to lift my mast up about two inches to open it.

Speaking of furling mechanisms, avoid ones that involve even one hole in the mast. I got caught in a sudden increase to 20-25 knots but stayed upright, my furler's pulley wouldn't bite the rope and rotate the mast to wrap the sail, and after about 15 minutes of vigorous flapping and shaking, the dang mast broke right at the rivet point for the bungee clip! Not too thrilled about that; first the furler failed to do its job and then the mast breaks around a weakness introduced by the mod. My next furler's going to look more like Mingle's:

https://www.akff.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=12&t=52130
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Re: Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby sog » Fri Feb 08, 2013 8:17 pm

great report squidley
will be getting the sail and amas for my revo 13 as soon as finances allow
been wondering how the bigger rudder would affect my landings as I'd have to raise it sooner than I do now .... the revo tracks lovely with the rudder down but is a pain to control with the rudder raised as you found ..... I'll just have to work it out
interesting to hear how easy to inflate and install the outriggers are on the water
I reckon the sail will definately improve my range ..... gonna have to re-organise my rod holders though so the rods don't foul the sail rope
should be fun
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Re: Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby Squidley » Fri Feb 08, 2013 8:27 pm

Thanks Sog. With the sailing rudder, I've found that as long as the water is just over my knees there's enough clearance to have it down once I'm seated.
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Re: Revo 11 with sail show/review

Postby Squidley » Mon Mar 11, 2013 8:44 pm

Since it was such a hot day today I decided to finally do some capsize drills with this kayak and generally play around with it.

I capsized it three times and re-entered it without much trouble. With it turned upside-down, I could reach the opposite side-handle without much of a stretch, so flipping it back was pretty easy. Certainly a plus of the narrower model. I found the sides were a little higher and squarer than my last yak, but not so much that I ever flipped it back over trying to get in over the side. Just used the usual trick of letting myself float up, then kicking and shoving the yak under me, rest, roll over.

I'm unsure if it's one of the three hatches or a poorly sealed rod holder mount, but there was about half a dozen car sponges of water to remove after the three capsizes. I think I'll find a place to stash a bailer or a handheld bilge pump. I could feel some odd forces from the water sloshing about inside but the kayak didn't lower in one place more than another and it was still getting around pretty quickly and making sharp turns when I asked it.

Crawled all over the yak to see how it was out of the seat. Found I could reach the rudder and also look straight into the front hatch without feeling too precarious. Also sat in the rear well, and it seems like it'd work for taking a passenger; a fair bit of this kayak's volume is toward the rear. Managed to stand and get back down safely one out of three times but I'd never fish that way.

I also gave the paddle a lot more attention than I had before. Basically besides traversing surf, you'd only want to use this in the event of your drive breaking. With the rudder down, it's very very difficult to change course til you stop paddling and nudge the rudder. With it up, the moment you stop paddling, the kayak will fang out and you'll be faced the way you came. I've talked about this before but after having a bit more of a go I feel the need to emphasise that paddling this thing isn't something you'd do for fun, but it'll get you home in a nice bee-line.

Well, good to get the drills done, and not a moment too soon.
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